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On January 31st our Art in the Park artists and some lovely volunteers from BSkyB crafted some willow animals for a local primary school. We had a gorgeous day weaving willow into fabulous beasts – now on display around the school and playground! Take a look below at some of our work….

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And thank you again to all the volunteers from BSkyB for their hard work!

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I am currently working in Acton Park creating a Story telling seating area.

In celebration of  the “Roots to the fruit project” as part of Black history month 2011.

I’ve been working with community elders and local children to create carved imagery for the Seating area.

The London Plane timber was donated by Ealing Council from a previously felled specimen.

The wood carves very well and has a distinctive grain pattern somtimes called lacewood due to its likeness to the patterns of lacework.

The project has been supported by Acton Arts Forum and The Apple Art block.

 The work is to be unveiled on Nov 5th 2011, 2-5pm.

More on my work at www.timnorris.co.uk

Featuring the famous wrapping of the William IV pub, the second in a series of retrospective blogs on past Art in the Park projects.

In 2007, Art in the Park was commissioned by Creation Trust to ‘wrap’ the derelict William IV pub.

This mammoth task involved a team of AiP artists, Bill Hudson, Tim Norris, Andrea Sinclair and Jill Newman, as well as collaborative effort from 3 local schools in the borough (Michael Faraday, Walworth Academy, Surrey Square Infants School).

The Concept and Construction

A jungle theme was decided upon and Bill and Tim went ahead to receive training on operating cherry pickers and Hilti guns (nail guns). The arctic camouflage, appropriately named ‘Camo Net’ was used to wrap the pub itself and came fire proofed from a specialist camouflage manufacturer. The artic camouflage is not actually used by those in the artic but it worked well for this project’s theme.

Artist Bill Hudson, the project’s coordinator explains,

The Arctic Camouflage highlights the details of a disused building thatwas one of the last pubs near Burgess Park. Usually Camouflage is used to hide or conceal something but Art in the Park is hoping to draw attention to a building which people would usually blank out because of its dilapidated state.

An Enchanted Forest theme was also used. Andrea and Jill headed workshops with local school children to develop the theme. The resulting artwork had been attached to the hoardings surrounding the building.

Drama!

The project had its ups and down, one occuring during the first few days of construction, with the Facelift cherry pickers breaking down midway! Artist Tim Norris found himself hovering several metres up unable to move! Luckily, Bill Hudson remembered the instructions given for such an incident and managed to rescue Tim. What drama!

Completion

All in all the project tooks two weeks to put up, with 1 1/2 of it on the actual wrapping and the rest spent on the artwork surrounding the building.

The result has transformed a derelict building into a local talking point. Artist and education workshop co-ordinator Andrea Sinclair, said,

We are reminding passers-by of its location in a rare green oasis in this part of London and giving a suggestion of its green and environmentally aware future.

Later in the summer, children from Michael Faraday School came to create further artwork for the building, working with a ‘dancers in trees’ theme.

For complete set of pictures of the project.

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The start of a series of new blogs on past projects from the same month! Art in the Park (AiP) have been involved with many projects in the past, many of which have not been documented or posted up. We are finally hauling out and sifting through our never ending folders of pictures (digitally that is!) to bring you the best of each project.

The first of this month’s retrospective post is the Southwold Gate Project (2008) which was created together with AiP artists Andrea Sinclair and Bill Hudson and children from Southwold Primary School. Inspiration derived from the different plant forms found on the Hackney Marshes, such as willows and rushes.

The first session with the children concentrated on possible designs and motifs for the gate.

In the second session, the children crafted 24 3D insect forms in sculpting clay.

These were used to make 72 cast steel insects for the final installation. The final design of the gates was then put together by gate artist Heather Burrell working with AiP artists Andrea Sinclair and Bill Hudson.

To prepare the 24 clay insects for casting at the foundry, the edges of the sculptures  were made at 45 degrees, avoiding overhangs or very thin areas. The details were also exaggerated. Once the models were suitable, silicon moulds were made, then finally resin casts  and patterns.

Here you can see the final result and here for more pictures. We did a similar project to this for Surrey Square School.

 

 

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