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Tag Archives: Sculpture

I am currently working in Acton Park creating a Story telling seating area.

In celebration of  the “Roots to the fruit project” as part of Black history month 2011.

I’ve been working with community elders and local children to create carved imagery for the Seating area.

The London Plane timber was donated by Ealing Council from a previously felled specimen.

The wood carves very well and has a distinctive grain pattern somtimes called lacewood due to its likeness to the patterns of lacework.

The project has been supported by Acton Arts Forum and The Apple Art block.

 The work is to be unveiled on Nov 5th 2011, 2-5pm.

More on my work at www.timnorris.co.uk

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This is part two of a series of sculptural drawings, as promised a few weeks ago.

I am still in the process of tidying up, sorting out files at the studio and home and I keep coming across portfolios of art, mostly drawings. A lot of these are getting recycled in the paper bin, others are filed away again in sets. Few are looked at more in-depth and this set is one of these.

All these drawings are from 2002 and cover a 6 month period during the time when there were a few commissions I was applying for. I was just getting ideas down as fast as I could so some have been worked on and developed and  some have a particular site in mind.

When I start to make a sculpture, the drawings are put aside and are very rarely looked at. I need to start thinking in the round/3D and not in 2D as the drawings are.

Look out from my next set of drawings in a few weeks.

For more of my work go to www.wmhudson.com

This is part one of a series of drawings of sculptures yet to be made…

All sculptors have different ways of working, I tend to do lots of drawing. The process of drawing inspire me and eventually lead onto the final design for my sculptures.

Other drawings like the sketches here just go into a pile, the ones below is the ‘like’ pile.

These drawings of mine were sketched between 1997-2004, here is a set of 10 that seems to work well together.

Look out for the next set of sculptural drawings in a few weeks time.

For more of my work, go to www.wmhudson.com or to see my community work, got to my artist’s corner on Art in the Park.

These photos were taken on my recent visit to check progress and tie in new growth.

Since I planted the willow, approx 2003/4  this work has been vandalised and eaten by a variety of animals, mostly wild deer,  stray cows and sheep, they seem to love the fresh shoots.  Finally, due to the temporary ramshackle fence now around the structure, the work is starting to take shape.  It’s now strong enough in places to take my weight!

Artist Tim Norris is currently on site at Oxford Brookes University Campus.  Working on site to complete the sculptural seating feature for the nature park .

The sculpture is constructed from Oxfordshire Green Oak, Soil and Grass. The location is home to a number of rare grassland species including the White bee orchid. Tim hopes the wild flowers will also collonise the sculpture.

The work is due to be completed in Jan 2011.

Further images of Tim’s work can be found at www.timnorris.co.uk

Hayward Gallery, London. Photograph taken by M...

Image via Wikipedia

Art in the Park recently attended the MOVE exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in Southbank Centre. The pieces in the gallery are intended to involve visitors in ways not normally expected.

…invites you to become a participant – or even a dancer – in installations and sculptures by internationally renowned visual artists and choreographers…explores the historical and current relationship between visual arts and dance…Performances are woven into an exhibition of sculptural works, set pieces and installations, which can be activated by the public and by a group of resident performers in the gallery.

excerpt from introduction of MOVE Gallery

A favourite piece of ours included Isaac Julien‘s Ten Thousand Waves (2010) which was a cinematic nine screen installation of three separate stories. One of the these riveting stories told of the tragedy that occurred in north east England in 200 when a team of Chinese cockle-pickers were drowned in Morecambe Bay. It truly does pull you, physically because of the multi-screens and mentally because of its composition. A definite must-see!

Another favourite of ours was the Christian Jankowski’s Rooftop Routine (2007), a hula hoop workout encouraging and teaching participants to try this hip-moving skill.

Others include Mike Kelley‘s playful Adaptation, Tania Bruguera‘s disturbing Untitled (Kassel) (2002), Lygia Clark‘s sensory The House in the Body (1968), William Forsythe’s gruelling The Fact of Matter (2009) and Bruce Nauman‘s unsettling Green Light Corridor (1970s).

Here are some pictures of some of our staff participating in the exhibition.

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